Blog Archives

Charting a path toward automated speed enforcement

ASEIn the United States, speeding is by far the leading factor in fatal crashes—equivalent to the use of drugs, alcohol, medication, and distracted driving combined. But although automated speed enforcement (ASE) is a promising countermeasure shown to reduce speeding and crashes, the idea remains contentious.

“Despite the demonstrated safety benefits of ASE, we’ve seen its deployment continue to be a highly controversial issue,” says Frank Douma, director of the State and Local Policy Program at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs. “Several states have enacted restrictions or even banned the use of ASE systems, and ASE has been rejected in a number of public referendums.”

To chart a possible path to ASE deployment, U of M researchers have completed a new study focusing on ASE in Minnesota. The research team included Douma, graduate research assistant Colleen Peterson with the Humphrey School, and Nichole Morris, principal researcher with the HumanFIRST Lab. The project was funded by the Roadway Safety Institute.

Posted in Safety, Technology, Transportation research

Is there safety in numbers for bicycles in Minneapolis?

bicyclist in MinneapolisIn observance of National Bike Month and Bike to Work Week 2017, Brendan Murphy of the U of M’s Accessibility Observatory shares his work on bicyclist safety in Minneapolis in this guest post.

More people are biking or walking to work in North American cities each year, including here in the Twin Cities. With increased biking and walking, more opportunities for conflict with cars exist, and the safety of our more vulnerable road users becomes an increasingly important consideration.

The goal of this study, funded by the Roadway Safety Institute, was to attempt to predict crash rates between cars and bicycles at street intersections in Minneapolis—based on car and bike traffic levels—and then assess whether areas of the city exist that have much higher per-bicyclist crash rates.

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Posted in Bicycling, Safety, Transportation research

Work-zone warnings could soon be delivered to your smartphone

Photo of a work zoneImagine that you’re driving to work as usual when your smartphone announces, “Caution, you are approaching an active work zone.” You slow down and soon spot orange barrels and highway workers on the road shoulder. Thanks to a new app being developed by University of Minnesota researchers, this scenario is on its way to becoming reality.

“Drivers often rely on signs along the roadway to be cautious and slow down as they approach a work zone. However, most work-zone crashes are caused by drivers not paying attention,” says Chen-Fu Liao, senior systems engineer at the U’s Minnesota Traffic Observatory. “That’s why we are working to design and test an in-vehicle work-zone alert system that announces additional messages through the driver’s smartphone or the vehicle’s infotainment system.”

As part of the project, sponsored by the Minnesota Department of Transportation, Liao and his team investigated the use of inexpensive Bluetooth low-energy (BLE) tags to provide in-vehicle warning messages. The BLE tags were programmed to trigger spoken messages in smartphones within range of the tags, which were placed on construction barrels or lampposts ahead of a work zone.

Posted in Construction, Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), Safety, Technology, Transportation research

April is National Distracted Driving Awareness Month

36667April is National Distracted Driving Awareness Month—a perfect time to remind all drivers to put safety first, put down their devices, and focus on driving.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, distracted driving claimed nearly 3,500 lives and injured approximately 391,000 people across the country in 2015. Teens were the largest age group reported as distracted at the time of fatal crashes.

At the University of Minnesota, efforts to reduce distracted driving range from research projects to education initiatives.

Posted in Education, Safety, Transportation research

National Work-Zone Awareness Week April 3-7

It’s National Work-Zone Awareness Week (NWZAW), and this year’s campaign urges drivers to recognize that work-zone safety is in their hands. NWZAW is held each year in the spring to bring national attention to motorist and worker safety and mobility issues in work zones.

University of Minnesota researchers are always working on new solutions to help improve work-zone safety. Read the full post for examples of recent and ongoing projects.

Posted in Safety, Technology, Transportation research

Building partnerships with tribal communities to improve safety

tribal1The motor vehicle crash fatality rate is higher for American Indians than for any other ethnic or racial group in the United States. Although the number of fatal crashes decreased in the nation as a whole by about 21 percent from 1975–2013, it increased by about 35 percent on American Indian reservation roads.

“These are huge disparities,” says Associate Professor Kathryn Quick. “Clearly, this is an issue that needs to be explored.”

In a project sponsored by the Roadway Safety Institute, Quick and Research Associate Guillermo Narváez, both with the U of M’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs, are collaborating with American Indian communities to better understand the transportation safety risks on tribal lands and develop strategies to mitigate these risks.

Posted in Pedestrian, Rural transportation, Safety, Transportation research

Kids learn to be seen, be safe at Tech Fest

rsisafetyexhibit-techfest2017-5532-240ppi-4928x3264On Saturday, Roadway Safety Institute (RSI) staff taught kids and their families how to “be seen and be safe” at Tech Fest, an annual event held at The Works Museum in Bloomington, Minnesota. The event, designed to inspire kids’ interest in engineering and technology, features hands-on activities and demos from the museum and its partners.

This year, kids explored RSI’s new permanent exhibit at the museum. The exhibit, which opened in late 2016, teaches visitors about reflectivity and why reflective clothing is critical for being seen by drivers at night.

Posted in Safety
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