Blog Archives

New course brings transportation planners to Minnesota

This fall, 15 professionals from the Shenzhen Urban Transportation Planning Center came to Minnesota for a new training opportunity. The four-week course was offered by the U of M’s Global Transit Innovations (GTI) Program, CTS, and the China Center’s Mingda Institute for Leadership Training.

“The overall goal is to help to advance the participants’ professional skills and knowledge of state-of-the-art transportation research and practices in the United States, and to identify international collaboration opportunities,” says Yingling Fan, associate professor in the Humphrey School of Public Affairs and GTI director.

Posted in Planning, Public transit, Workforce development

Happiness: a new way to measure transportation systems

People experience different emotions during daily travel. Their happiness varies depending on the mode they use, trip duration, and other factors. U of M researchers are exploring how happiness could become a useful metric to assess transportation systems and guide policymaking, supplementing more common measures such as mobility and accessibility.

“Happiness is increasingly seen as a gauge of an individual’s well-being, and this has many social implications,” says Yingling Fan, associate professor in the Humphrey School of Public Affairs. “Happier people often are more productive and creative, have better family and social relationships, live longer, and, in general, are more successful.”

Americans spend, on average, about 75 minutes on daily trips. “Given the known benefits of emotional well-being, it’s important for planners and policymakers to understand the connection between transportation and happiness,” Fan says.

Posted in Bicycling, Planning, Public transit, Transportation research, Travel Behavior

Humphrey School works to ensure self-driving vehicles are accessible to all

A driverless bus on a city streetWhen Myrna Peterson wants to visit downtown Grand Rapids, Minnesota, from her home two miles outside the city limits, she uses the most convenient vehicle she has: her motorized wheelchair. Peterson, who has been in a wheelchair since she was seriously injured in a 1995 car accident, has few other options to get around town.

Grand Rapids, a city of about 11,000 people in north central Minnesota, is like many other small communities in Greater Minnesota. It has limited bus service, especially during the evenings and on weekends. People with mobility issues, like Peterson, face even more constraints when trying to go shopping, get to an appointment, or go out to dinner.

That’s why Peterson has become an advocate for more accessible transportation in her community, and wants Grand Rapids to be the location of a pilot program to test driverless vehicles. Peterson served on a task force, along with researchers from the U of M’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs and CTS, to examine issues of equity and access to driverless cars for people with low incomes or disabilities.

Posted in Accessibility (for people with disabilities), Planning, Rural transportation, Technology, Transportation research

Transformation and development: A student’s reflection on visiting Shenzhen

In May, the Global Transit Innovations (GTI) program coordinated a study-abroad course that took 16 University of Minnesota students to China. The intensive two-week course focused on high-density urban and regional development and included visits to five cities in the Yangtze and Pearl River Delta regions.

In this guest post, student Elmo Elsayad offers his reflections on Shenzhen, the penultimate city visited by course participants. His focus is on the urban transformation and development that has shaped the city during the last 30 years.

Posted in Education, Planning, Urban transportation

Street design and bike sharing: A student’s reflection on visiting Nanjing

In May, the Global Transit Innovations (GTI) program coordinated a study-abroad course that took 16 University of Minnesota students to China. The intensive two-week course focused on high-density urban and regional development and included visits to five cities in the Yangtze and Pearl River Delta regions.

In this guest post, student Joe Polacek reflects on Nanjing, the third stop on the course’s itinerary. His highlights include an example of creative street design and experiences with Chinese bike-sharing systems.

Posted in Bicycling, Education, Planning, Sharing economy, Urban transportation

Report summarizes work on transportation policy and economic competitiveness

The U’s Transportation Policy and Economic Competitiveness (TPEC) Program was formed in 2013 to provide a better understanding of the impacts of transportation policies and innovations on Minnesota’s economy. A new report outlining TPEC’s progress to date is available on the TPEC website.

Housed in the State and Local Policy Program of the Humphrey School of Public Affairs, TPEC creates objective knowledge to inform decision making. Researchers focus on three overarching topics: transportation finance, industry clusters and freight infrastructure, and technology.

Posted in Economics, Planning, Transportation research

Public participation, poetry, and planning: A student’s reflection on visiting Suzhou

In May, the Global Transit Innovations (GTI) program coordinated a study-abroad course that took 16 University of Minnesota students to China. The intensive two-week course focused on high-density urban and regional development and included visits to five cities in the Yangtze and Pearl River Delta regions.

In this guest post, student Emilie Hitch reflects on Suzhou, the second Chinese city visited by course participants. In particular, she examines the differences in planning and public participation between China and the United States and explores what each country could learn from the other.

Posted in Education, Planning
Follow CTS Online

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Categories
Archives