Blog Archives

New video showcases TPEC Program accomplishments

An efficient and innovative transportation system is critical for economic vitality, and a new video showcases how the Transportation Policy and Economic Competitiveness (TPEC) Program is building a foundation to make that system a reality.

The TPEC Program conducts research, creates tools for policymakers, and engages in outreach to increase understanding of the relationship between transportation and economic development. Housed in the State and Local Policy Program of the Humphrey School of Public Affairs, TPEC creates objective knowledge to inform decision making and, ultimately, strengthen our region’s economic competitiveness and foster a high quality of life.

Posted in Connected and autonomous vehicles, Economics, Freight, Planning, Transportation funding, Transportation research

RCP selects Scott and Ramsey Counties as next community partners

The University of Minnesota’s Resilient Communities Project (RCP) recently announced that Ramsey County and Scott County will be its community partners for the 2018–2019 academic year. It’s the first time in the six-year history of the program that it will assist two partners in the same year.

RCP, housed within the U of M’s Center for Urban and Regional Affairs, seeks to connect students’ innovation, ingenuity, and fresh perspectives with local government agencies to learn about their needs, conduct research, and develop solutions. In the coming months, staff will define the scope and purpose of individual projects before matching them with courses offered at the University in fall 2018 and spring 2019.

Ramsey County’s proposal identified up to 18 potential projects, including removing transportation barriers to employment and exploring innovative stormwater management practices. Scott County’s proposal identified 14 potential projects, including planning for autonomous vehicles and promoting active living.

Posted in Education, Planning, Workforce development

Social media can be effective part of public engagement plans

shutterstock_662208199Social media can be effective as a strategic and select part of public engagement plans, according to findings of a U of M study. Co-principal investigators were Professor Ingrid Schneider of the Department of Forest Resources and Associate Professor Kathryn Quick of the Humphrey School of Public Affairs. “Public engagement for transportation planning and programs is not only required, it’s a crucial component in policy and project success,” Schneider says. “Since 2000, advances in technology and communications provide opportunities to engage with more people in new ways.”

The multipronged, multiyear project investigated current knowledge about public engagement through social media nationwide and in Minnesota. It also developed guidance about how social media may be used to reach and engage diverse populations in the state about transportation planning and projects.

Posted in Engagement, Planning, Transportation research

Urban outfitting: Imagining cities for a changing world

hhh_urbanWith as many as three billion more people expected to live in cities by 2050, there’s renewed interest in a topic often taken for granted: infrastructure. Many are wondering if there are options better than vast highways, elaborate power grids, and complex underground water systems. And cities are already trying localized, “distributed” systems such as community solar power, rain gardens, bike sharing, and urban farms. But what should such systems look like? How should they work? And how should we measure their impact—on efficiency and cost? What about their impact on people’s health and happiness?

Researchers from across the globe are asking such questions as part of a massive four-year effort to rethink urban infrastructure. Knit together in the sprawling Sustainable Healthy Cities network, they are attempting to provide the analyses needed to understand the effects of decisions cities have already made as well as envision what cities might do in the future.

The network, supported by a $12 million grant from the U.S. National Science Foundation, is anchored at the University of Minnesota. CTS Scholar Yingling Fan, an associate professor in urban and regional planning at the Humphrey School, is a co-principal investigator.

Posted in Infrastructure, Land use, Planning, Transportation research, Urban transportation

Fostering transit-oriented development requires persistence, coordination, and strategy

Many policymakers support transit-oriented development (TOD) for its potential to direct regional growth into a more efficient and sustainable pattern. However, the ability to achieve this public goal is largely dependent on private-sector decisions.

“The governments and agencies with the greatest desire for TOD have little ability to implement it through their own actions,” says Andrew Guthrie, a research fellow at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs. “Conversely, the private-sector entities whose actions are needed to implement TOD may not share a city’s or regional planning body’s goals for transit-oriented growth patterns and built forms.”

This fundamental difference in perspectives demands creativity from planners and regional policymakers. In a new study, Guthrie and Associate Professor Yingling Fan explore how the public sector can best overcome these obstacles and encourage TOD at a regional scale. “Previous research has focused primarily on the impacts and benefits of TOD, not on how to accomplish it in the real world,” Guthrie says. “Our project helps fill that need.”

Posted in Land use, Planning, Public transit, Transportation research, Urban transportation

U of M researchers evaluate I-405 tolled corridor in Washington

University of Minnesota researchers recently completed a traffic data and performance analysis of the I-405 tolled corridor in Washington State.

Lawmakers in Washington authorized the creation of express toll lanes (ETLs), including the conversion of some existing high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes to high-occupancy toll (HOT) lanes, in 2011. The lanes opened to traffic in September 2015.

Last year, U of M researchers analyzed traffic data from 2014–2017 to determine where the I-405 ETL facility is working and where it is underperforming. In addition, the team was asked to compare its findings against relevant performance measures contained in state statute.

Posted in Economics, Planning, Traffic operations, Transportation funding, Transportation research

From grain supply chains to flying medical devices: What’s next for TPEC?

grain2Driving south of the Twin Cities on a fall late afternoon, you’ll see the sun shining pale and coarse through the dust kicked up by autumn harvesters. On either side of the road, grain stalks roll on in a smooth, seemingly endless tan sheet. But when the harvest ends and the crops are sorted, where does all that grain go?

With grain and feed comprising 28 percent of all freight volume along local highways—the largest share of any commodity in the state—answering this question is not only a matter of safe and efficient transportation planning. It also means securing the livelihood of 340,000 state residents who work in Minnesota’s growing agriculture sector.

At the Humphrey School of Public Affairs, researchers with the Transportation Policy and Economic Competitiveness (TPEC) Program have mapped this movement on Minnesota roads. Our novel GIS-based approach unveils how technological, political, and market shifts in the grain supply chain impact the way local producers and wholesalers navigate their local freight networks—a network that spans road, rail, and barge infrastructure.

Now, TPEC is shifting its attention to the medical supply chain, which is another central driver of the Minnesota economy. But how do we design transportation policy that invigorates and accommodates growth in this burgeoning sector? What lessons are there to learn from grain that can inform this new study?

Posted in Economics, Freight, Planning, Transportation research
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