The economy, the environment, and the future: A student’s reflection on visiting Hong Kong

HK7In May, the Global Transit Innovations (GTI) program coordinated a study-abroad course that took 16 University of Minnesota students to China. The intensive two-week course focused on high-density urban and regional development and included visits to five cities in the Yangtze and Pearl River Delta regions.

In this guest post, student Joseph Ward offers highlights from Hong Kong, the final stop on the course’s itinerary. Ward’s reflections focus on pedestrian infrastructure, density, the economy, and the environment.

Posted in Economics, Education, Environment

Summer interns put skills to work in real-world projects

This summer, civil engineering undergrads put what they’ve learned in the classroom to work in a professional environment as part of the 10-week Civil Engineering Internship Program.

Working in a variety of offices at the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT), interns gained hands-on experience in roadway engineering, bridge design, roadside vegetation and erosion control, bicycle and pedestrian safety, and more.

Posted in Education, Workforce development

Transformation and development: A student’s reflection on visiting Shenzhen

In May, the Global Transit Innovations (GTI) program coordinated a study-abroad course that took 16 University of Minnesota students to China. The intensive two-week course focused on high-density urban and regional development and included visits to five cities in the Yangtze and Pearl River Delta regions.

In this guest post, student Elmo Elsayad offers his reflections on Shenzhen, the penultimate city visited by course participants. His focus is on the urban transformation and development that has shaped the city during the last 30 years.

Posted in Education, Planning, Urban transportation

Street design and bike sharing: A student’s reflection on visiting Nanjing

In May, the Global Transit Innovations (GTI) program coordinated a study-abroad course that took 16 University of Minnesota students to China. The intensive two-week course focused on high-density urban and regional development and included visits to five cities in the Yangtze and Pearl River Delta regions.

In this guest post, student Joe Polacek reflects on Nanjing, the third stop on the course’s itinerary. His highlights include an example of creative street design and experiences with Chinese bike-sharing systems.

Posted in Bicycling, Education, Planning, Sharing economy, Urban transportation

Report summarizes work on transportation policy and economic competitiveness

The U’s Transportation Policy and Economic Competitiveness (TPEC) Program was formed in 2013 to provide a better understanding of the impacts of transportation policies and innovations on Minnesota’s economy. A new report outlining TPEC’s progress to date is available on the TPEC website.

Housed in the State and Local Policy Program of the Humphrey School of Public Affairs, TPEC creates objective knowledge to inform decision making. Researchers focus on three overarching topics: transportation finance, industry clusters and freight infrastructure, and technology.

Posted in Economics, Planning, Transportation research

Public participation, poetry, and planning: A student’s reflection on visiting Suzhou

In May, the Global Transit Innovations (GTI) program coordinated a study-abroad course that took 16 University of Minnesota students to China. The intensive two-week course focused on high-density urban and regional development and included visits to five cities in the Yangtze and Pearl River Delta regions.

In this guest post, student Emilie Hitch reflects on Suzhou, the second Chinese city visited by course participants. In particular, she examines the differences in planning and public participation between China and the United States and explores what each country could learn from the other.

Posted in Education, Planning

Untangling the safety impacts of Minnesota’s I-35W improvements

MnPASS system on I-35W in Minneapolis, Minnesota.With the aim of reducing congestion on the Twin Cities’ highly traveled I-35W corridor between the Minnesota River and I-94, the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) began a major set of I-35W improvements in 2009 as part of the Federal Highway Administration’s Urban Partnership Agreement (UPA). Among the improvements was the addition of a priced dynamic shoulder lane (PDSL) on parts of the 17-mile stretch of highway; however, following the opening of these improvements, the frequency of rear-end crashes increased in certain sections—especially in the PDSL regions.

To untangle the underlying causes of this increase, MnDOT enlisted the help of researchers in the Department of Civil, Environmental, and Geo- Engineering. “Our primary objective was to determine if these increases were direct effects of the improvements or if they were due to changes in the traffic conditions,” says Professor Gary Davis, the principal investigator. “MnDOT was interested in extending some or all of these improvements to other corridors but needed to know what the safety impacts were to aid its decision making.”

Posted in Infrastructure, Safety, Technology, Traffic operations, Transportation research, Urban transportation
Follow CTS Online

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Categories
Archives